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Desperate opioid users are pawns in lucrative insurance fraud scheme

Samantha Herring Soon after he arrived in Florida, the treatment center staff told him his insurance had run out. His broker had stopped paying the premium, he said. But almost immediately, the staff came through with a miraculous solution: His father, they claimed, had sent the money. There was just one problem: Kagiwada has never met his father. The treatment center, Kagiwada surmised, had paid his premium because it was a drop in the bucket compared with what they could bill his insurance provider. He was getting drug-tested three to five days a week, at hundreds of dollars a sample, he said. He declined to name the center or the broker. A Massachusetts woman brokered to Florida earlier this year said she was also enrolled in a Pennsylvania insurance plan. The woman did not want to be identified because she is fearful of retribution for sharing her story. She was already on her father’s health insurance, she said, but the person who arranged her trip gave her “a whole new insurance plan” — complete with a new home address in Pennsylvania. STAT forecast: Opioids could kill nearly 500,000 Americans in the next decade When she got to the treatment center in Hollywood, Fla., she said she realized the intake staff knew her address was a fake, and just didn’t care. When they asked for her street address, she had to fumble through her phone for it. “I know we’re drug addicts and we’re a little crazy,” she said. “But who doesn’t know their own street name?” The treatment center she went to was a mess, she said. Patients samhsa.gov openly used drugs without being kicked out, and men came into the house to have sex with women. She was required to give urine samples up to three times a day just so they could bill her insurance for the tests, she said. “The whole thing was one big insurance scam,” she said.

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Writers and Their Drugs of Choice Arthur Rimbaud’s long poem “A Season in Hell” was influenced by opium addiction, critics often suggest that he was writing about the horror of detoxification when he wrote “Night in Hell”. Reading this in college I was struck by the emotional starkness the work, Rimbaud writes in a way that demands courage of the reader, “My guts are on fire. The power of the poison twists my arms and legs, cripples me, and drives me to the ground. I die of thirst, I suffocate, I cannot cry.” Other notable poets that struggled with addiction include Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley who was addicted to the liquid opium of the time laudanum, a struggle shared by Charles Baudelaire, who once wrote, “You have to be always drunk. That’s all there is to it—it’s the only way. So as not to feel the horrible burden of time that breaks your back and bends you to the earth, you have to be continually drunk. But on what? Wine, poetry or virtue, as you wish.” More on Baudelaire and his mood and mind altering preferences below. The Beat Generation openly cited drug use as and to aid in composition and legitimized the practice in that they produced great works. The Poetry Foundation writes that “Allen Ginsberg stated “that some of his best poetry was written under the influence of drugs: the second part of Howl with peyote, Kaddish with amphetamines, and Wales—A Visitation with LSD. While I wouldn’t recommend his methods, it’s hard to argue with Ginsberg’s results: his “angelheaded hipsters burning for the ancient heavenly connection to the starry dynamo in the machinery of night” are a part of the American literary canon.” The Romantic poet composed the hypnotic ‘Kubla Khan’ one of his most famous pieces after waking from an opium induced stupor in which he’d dreamed of the stately pleasure-domes of a Chinese emperor, Coleridge’s addiction finally killed him in 1834. The autobiographical account of his addiction ‘Confessions of an English Opium Eater’, published in 1821, brought De Quincey fame, Baudelaire widened the readership in 1860 when he published a French translation ‘Les paradis artificiels’. Baudelaire was an established member of the Club de Hachichins (Hashish Club), which met between 1844 and 1849 and counted Alexandre Dumas and Eugène Delacroix among its numbers. Baudelaire wrote on hash, ‘among the drugs most efficient in creating what I call the artificial ideal… the most convenient and the most handy are hashish and opium.’ Robert Louis Stevenson, suffering from the effects of tuberculosis and medical cocaine wrote ‘The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde’ (1886). As his wife, who hated the book and tried to destroy it, noted, ‘That an invalid in my husband’s condition of health should have been able to perform the manual labour nimh alone of putting 60,000 words on paper in six days, seems almost incredible.’ In ‘The Doors of Perception’, (1954), Huxley recounts at length his experience on the hallucinogenic mescaline which is to be found in the Peyote cactus. The book is the inspiration behind Jim Morrison’s band name ‘The Doors’. Burroughs used his experience of addiction as inspiration throughout his writing, most notably in Junkie (1953) and Naked Lunch (1959). The great sci-fi writer, author of ‘Do Android’s Dream of Electric Sheep’ – the adaptation of which is of course Blade Runner, the new version of which is currently showing) Philip K Dick’s intensive use of speed and hallucinogens inspired much of his work. It is said that his use of Semoxydrine – similar to speed – fueled his epic production of 11 sci-fi novels, essays and short stories all in the space of one year between 1963 and 1964. You could argue that credit for the amazing works of these authors should be given to the chemicals that they used to facilitate their writing, but that would be doing the writers a great disservice.

http://drug.addictionblog.org/writers-and-their-drugs-of-choice/ private rehab for alcohol private rehab for alcohol

Home » News & Events » NIDA Notes » Treatment » Crime Does Not Increase Around Methadone Clinics in Baltimore Crime Does Not Increase Around Methadone Clinics in Baltimore Citizens’ concerns that methadone treatment centers (MTCs) might be focal points for serious crime are unwarranted, a recent NIDA-supported study suggests. Dr. Susan Boyd and colleagues at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore found that crime rates in the immediate vicinities of that city’s MTCs were level with the rates in the surrounding neighborhoods. The researchers used Baltimore City Police Department records from 1999‒2001 and global positioning data to plot the distribution of FBI Part I crimes (homicide, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson) within a 100-meter (328-foot) radius of 15 MTCs. A statistical analysis of the plots showed that the crimes were no more frequent within 25 meters of the MTCs than they were 75 to 100 meters away. In contrast to the case with MTCs, the likelihood of Part I crimes rose with closer proximity to convenience stores. The researchers suggest that the high volume of foot traffic around these stores provides opportunities for criminals to find victims. Consistent with this surmise, the frequency of crime declined near mid-block residences, where foot traffic is relatively sparse. The study MTCs included all but one of the 16 centers located in Baltimore. They were situated in diverse communities, including inner-city, working-class, and middle-class neighborhoods, according to Dr. Boyd. The convenience stores and residences were located in neighborhoods that closely resembled those of the MTCs in demographic and social features that influence crime rates. “There’s no evidence from our study of increased reports of crime around the methadone clinics,” says Dr. Boyd. She and colleagues are now analyzing data on actual arrests around the study sites to see whether drug sales and possession increase with proximity to methadone treatment centers. The researchers hope that demonstrating that MTCs are not hot spots for crime will reduce public resistance to the building of new centers, and thus remove an impediment to making methadone treatment more widely available. Crime Rates Around 15 Methadone Treatment Facilities, and Matched Convenience Stores and Residential Neighborhoods in Baltimore, 1999–2001 The annual rate of FBI Part I crimes* per unit area (1692 m2) was not significantly associated with proximity to methadone clinics. In contrast, crime increased with proximity to convenience stores and decreased with proximity to points within residential neighborhoods. *Homicide, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson.

https://www.drugabuse.gov/news-events/nida-notes/2012/12/crime-does-not-increase-around-methadone-clinics-in-baltimore